Category Archives: genealogy

Jamboree 2015

Southern California Genealogical Society hosted the Jamboree in Burbank, California June 4-7.  This year the Jamboree is having live streaming and recordings that are available until July 5.  If you have the opportunity click here and watch some of the great speakers.

This year I volunteered in the Tech Zone on June 5.  It was a last minute decision that turned out to be a very rewarding hour for myself, as well as the couple I was helping.  This couple came to the Jamboree for the first time, new to genealogy, just wanting to learn what is out there and how to access it.  After a quick search on Veterans Administration we confirmed her Grandfather was buried in the Veterans Cemetery, then to find Grandma.  Asked if they checked Find A Grave to see if they had a photo of the headstone, so we went there, no picture… but had them establish an account then a virtual cemetery, and request a photo, link Grandma & Grandpa..   They are hooked, learning, and making strides now!  Don’t you just love sharing what you love to do?  I do..

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NERGC is coming…

Can I say I’m so excited for NERGC.. not only do I get to go to Rhode Island.. but I get to do GENEALOGY!! Something I don’t get to do usually when I’m visiting.

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What is NERGC?  It’s New England Regional Genealogical Conference, this year it’s in Providence, Rhode Island at the Rhode Island Convention Center April 15-18.

I have signed up for Craig Scott’s Military Research class.  Hopefully I can learn a couple more techniques to better my research.  Gosh knows this is an area I need help on! Plus I’ve selected lots of classes to have

Link

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The FGS conference is just around the corner, have you started to think about your list?  Most people are thinking about the naughty and nice list.  For those of us attending FGS Conference we are also thinking about a to-do list for the Family History Library in Salt Lake City while writing out those cards.  In those moments of less chaos I’ll gathering my list of classes, and speakers, and events and start planning my days.

I didn’t plan my trip to the library out very well… I didn’t account for falling down the “rabbit hole” when I found a whole page of ancestors and lost track of what I was looking for.  You know you have done this before….

As a newbie to last year’s conference, I didn’t know who’s who so planning a class by who the instructor was really was not on my list.  I wanted to take things that were going to get me more help in areas that I thought I needed.  Remember there was so much to see, so much to do.  I did not have a back up plan last year for classes I planned but were full.  On a lighter note, there were also products and services that I was interested in, as well as meeting the presenters in the Expo Hall during their downtime.

The information from the conference gave me resources to listen to webinars, and links to blogs.  This helped fine tune my subject areas, but also helped prepare for next year. I’ll be looking for more advanced classes.  This will give me time also to volunteer with FGS.

Upon registering for the FGS Conference, I’ve already planned luncheons. Now I just have to see what classes and other events that I can attend.  Have you heard…. Alex Boye and the One World Children’s Choir will be preforming at FGS Conference! Check out the list of activities on the FGS Conference page.

Wrapping up from MGP2

 

I’ve been taking MGP2 class with Dear Myrtle and the fabulous panel of participants, they have so much knowledge and it’s been wonderful to learn from them.  This class has definitely opened my eyes that I have a lot more work to do to improve my research and citing my sources. I’ve been doing my homework, listening to last the prior MGP classes and understanding the MGP process. Now, I need to start writing more about my research and write about my research and see understand that every blog post doesn’t have to be perfect.  Write about the person, and make a question and follow the proof standard of “who, what, where, where is, where at” to come to a conclusion, even if it hasn’t been 100% proven or not.  Then ask for feedback.  You never know what that kind of comments that will bring (other than spam J ). The hope would be that someone, somewhere out there may be related and find what you don’t know, and maybe even make cousin connections.

So here is my conclusions of things I need to work on:

Blogging my homework:  Conflict: Blogging is hard to me because, I’m afraid to put the information out there with the fear of copyright infringements. I’ve been doing the homework, but not posting it. Resolution: Take a writing class and just write, cite my sources, ask for feedback from the communities.  Know I will get better, the more you do, the quicker you will learn! Be positive!

Research: Conflict: Rhode Island records are extremely limited, most of my family research I need to work on are in that area. Resolution: Work on something in my research that is available online. Make a really long to-do list and set up a research trip to Rhode Island.

Language: Take a French class, to read, and write and understand French!  There are a lot of records available online from Canada that have a big impact on my family history.

Off to get ready to take the last chapter and hopefully graduate from MGP2 with the knowledge that I tried, and know that never stop learning, and network.

Citations:

Reference Book: Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) by Thomas W. Jones [Book available from NGS Genealogy also on Amazon Kindle ]

Mastering Genealogy Proof Class 2 available on Google Plus in the Dear Myrtle Community

Saturday Night Random Research

 

Thank you to +Randy Seaver from Geneamusing.com Saturday Night Random Research Fun. Here is my entry:

The name that The Random Name Generator gave me was Wilton M. Barker.  The challenge was to do a target search off the first census result.

I started using Ancestry.com, and then went to Familysearch.com and Findagrave.com all accessed April 20, 2014. This was a fun activity, truth be told, by citations took longer than the research.

1)      1940 U.S. Federal Census for Wilton M. Barker[1] white male, age 81, born in South Carolina, residing in the same address for the 1935 census. He had attended 3rd grade, but he works for himself as a farmer, owner of his property.  His wife Mary A, age 68, white, born in South Carolina, residing in the same address for the 1935 census.  They have two single adult children living in the house, Naomi age 48, and son Archie 45, both the highest grade completed shows the 7th grade.

2)     1930 U.S. Federal Census shows William M. Barker[2] age 70, and Mary A. age 62; both born in South Carolina.  The age of marriage shows for William age 28, and Mary age 20.  The adult children living in the home were Joe age 38, Arch age 36, and Naoma age 34.  *

3)    1920 U.S. Federal Census shows Will M. Barker[3] age 59, and Mary A. age 50 residing in the same address as the previous census.  The household includes their children Joe 28, Neomai 25, Arch 23, John T. 22, Willie M. 16 (female).

4)   1900 U.S. Federal Census shows William M. Barker[4] age 39 born October 1860, and Mary A. age 31 born Nov 1868, residing in same home, farming, with their children Lou V. (daughter) age 9 born Sept 1890, Joe M. age 8 born March 1892, Neomia V. age 6, born Sept 1893, Archie P. age 4, born June 1895, John T. age 2, born Dec 1897.

5)   William M. Barker[5] died April 23, 1943 at his residence in Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina.  Mary Amanda Todd Barker[6] listed as his wife, and the informant was his son Arch P. Barker.  Mary Amanda Barker[7] died on February 16, 1952.

6)   William and Mary Amanda were buried in Stamp Creek Cemetery[8], with their children found on FindaGrave.com :

  1. Naomi Barker[9] died March 24, 1962
  2. Archie Barker[10] died February 22, 1963
  3. Joe Barker[11] died April 23, 1960
  4. John T.[12] died December 16, 1976

*The discrepancies in the 1940 ,1930, and 1900 U.S. Federal Census’ I have concluded the name changes from Wilton to Wiliam and Namoi , Neomia to Naomi from were just data entry errors.  There is also an Ancestry.com Family Tree online which this information appears to have matched to.


[1] Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census; Census Place: Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina; Roll: T627_3828; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 37-10
[2] Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census; Census Place: Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina; Roll: 2207; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 0006; Image: 322.0;
[3] Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census; Census Place: Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina; Roll: T625_1706; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 135; Image: 147
[4] Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census; Census Place: Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina; Roll: 1537; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0069
[5] Familysearch.com. South Carolina Deaths, 1915-1943,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N922-RJP : accessed 20 Apr 2014), William Moss Barker, 23 Apr 1943; citing Keowee, Oconee, South Carolina, cn 15726, Department of Archives and History, State Records Center, Columbia; FHL microfilm 1943927
[6] Findagrave.com reference to Mary Amanda Todd Barker headstone located in Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
[7] Familysearch.com. South Carolina Deaths, 1944-1955, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FPM7-3BW : accessed 21 Apr 2014), Amanda Todd Barker, 16 Feb 1952; citing Stamp Creek, Oconee, South Carolina, cn 2005, Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia; FHL microfilm 2400692
[8] Findagrave.com reference to Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
[9] Findagrave.com reference to Naomi Barker headstone located in Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
[10] Findagrave.com reference to Archie Barker headstone located in Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
[11] Findagrave.com reference to Joe Barker headstone located in Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
[12] Findagrave.com reference to John Barker headstone located in Stamp Creek Cemetery in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA accessed April 20, 2014
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MGP Chapter 3 Homework – Part 1

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MGP Chapter 3 Thorough Research and Reasonably Exhaustive Search homework – Part 1

This chapter is a struggle for me personally. The question during the MGP2 training is where do you start looking for your records.  My online search starts with Family Search, Ancestry and now NEGHS..I also use the books and films at the Family History Center in Mesa. Over the years I have amassed many hardcover books and cd’s that have local and regional information. There are a couple of challenges being a native Rhode Islander. Most of the information is not able to be researched online, much of what is just an index notation you must physically acquire. My version of research trip for instance included a stop at the Town Hall Records Room, in the Town of North Providence, for the death records for 1916. [ld1] I was lucky as it happened to be only one page.  The original intent was looking for my 4 times grand father Ernest Everett Lippitt; however looking at the whole document later there are 6 other family member’s on this one page.  You have to love small towns! I find it useful to go to the Archive building and start coping information on several surnames from a particular town, over a span of a couple years that I’m focused on. I will then take that information home and dissect the information into a more manageable format I can work with.  This is not the best way to do research, but until I live closer or the information is available online, this is the only way I can get the information for extensive research done.  For my own style of research, I can tell you this has worked very well for me.  I have the 1925 Rhode island Census for Taylor, Lippitt, Angell, and Desmarais in some form of hard copy.  This information isn’t online, and most importantly, 95% of these people are my relatives.  This for me was not a waste of time or money as it provides me quick access to invaluable research data.  This information is also entered by the individual person on the census card, and also often signed.Other cards could be completed by a family member on their behalf.

The summary of the answers:

The appendix A is about Phillip Pritchett, the answering the basic genealogy questions of who, what, when, and where.  To find the answer where would you look? I’d use census, birth, marriage, death, tax rolls, and other legal records that were available from the area.  You wouldn’t want to use an index, you want the original source records.


[ld1]Deaths Registered in Town of North Providence year 1916, North Providence, RI Townhall, page 125,

I’m a bit behind on my homework, so the answers to the questions to follow.

Here is the link to the You Tube Video with +DearMyrtle MGP2 Class

Reference Book: Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) by Thomas W. Jones [Book available from NGS Genealogy also on Amazon Kindle ]

Link

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MPG chapter 2 Fundamental Concepts homework part 1

I like MGP2 participant Kerry Scott’s comparison of the copyright to be able to answer the questions in this program.  Here is my summary of Chapter 2.

This chapter is about a proving a connection based on a reasonable conclusion based on the factual documents that you have found.  This boils down to the 5 basic questions of who, what, when, where and why. The genealogical proof references four other parts categories, relationships and identity and activity.

Dr. Jones gives an article to review of a family to using timeline of legal documents but it does not contain birth, marriage or death records.  The question is to find out how the said individuals are connected and how did you come to this conclusion.

I’m a bit behind on my homework, so the answers to the questions to follow.

Reference Book: Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) by Thomas W. Jones [Book available from NGS Genealogy also on Amazon Kindle ]

Jackpot on a Google search

Have you ever Googled a name, and then found a jackpot of information in one place, and it’s not a genealogy site.  Well my jackpot was this book found on Google Books: First Record Book of The Society of the Colonial Dames in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations ending August 31, 1896.

It’s the Organization’s record book of the members ending 1896. Amazingly, it provides the descent information of how these particular women are related to the one of the 13 original signers of the first written compact of Providence Plantations. Thomas Angell is one of these fine men, and a direct relative, 10x great grandfather of my mother-in-law.  WOW talk about genealogy proof of multiple relatives.  Thomas Angell’s son John married Roger William’s granddaughter Ruth Field.  Their families were well documented, since Roger Williams paid for Thomas Angell’s passage to the new world. Since Thomas was a minor, he also followed Roger as one of the four original settlers of what would become the settlement of Providence.

To see if this organization is still in existence I found The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America.  I sent them an email today.  Let’s hope this organization is part of the bigger national organization!  This opens more doors for the proof for Daughters of the American Revolution as well as this fine organization.

Hat’s off to Google today!

Citations:

First Record Book of The Society of the Colonial Dames in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations ending August 31, 1896. Instituted March 28,1892, Incorporated January, 1893. Printed Providence, Snow & Farnham Printers, 1897.  This is the best citation I can give, since it’s no longer available except online.  (lets hope this passes for a citation) – comments welcome.

National Society of the Colonial Dames of America  http://www.nscda.org/

Daughters of the American Revolution http://www.dar.org

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